Hae Chu

Class Year: 

2006
Hometown: Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

School: 

Edward W. Clark High School

Language: 

Korean

Always trying to tell an interesting story, some days Hae will tell you he chose the Huntsman Program with a flip of a coin.  With a smile on his face and a story to tell, Hae defined his Huntsman experience more by the community and camaraderie than the coursework.  He immersed himself in the vast diversity the Huntsman community had to offer.   Lounging in the program office during his free time to trade stories or debate with other students was as rewarding and educational as the vast array of courses he took. 

As a member of the Huntsman Student Advisory Board, he always strived to foster interaction between different classes by organizing events.  Ski trips, Coffee hours, movie nights, anything to get Huntsman students together to foster a sense of community.  Even today, since graduating in 2006, Hae stops by the Program office from time to time to speak with current students and keep the sense of an inter-class community alive.

While Hae chose the Huntsman Program for what he believed would be a strict and rigid curriculum that would ensure he remained focused on his studies he was surprised and thankful for the flexibility the program provided.  Though much of his Huntsman experience was defined by his interaction with his fellow students, the course of study he chose was uniquely his own.  He chose the non-traditional OPIM concentration and took courses in Psychology, Mathematics and Linguistics.  He also studied an additional language (Japanese) in addition to his target (Korean) and studied abroad in both Japan and Korea.

After graduation, Hae moved to London to work for HSBC as an analyst for the Structured Credit Trading Group before transferring to New York in 2007 as an Assistant Vice President for the Proprietary Credit Trading Group.   In 2009, he made the jump from banking to consulting.  He is currently a consultant for a venture funded health care consulting firm based in Chicago called Accretive Health.